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Wireguard

wireguard future vpn tech fast speed secure Experimental

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#1 jugs

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 02:47 AM

Hey guys,

 

I was wondering now that your other competitors are actively integrating Wireguard into their offerings, when do you think you'll have something ready for your customers?



#2 Khariz

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 04:35 AM

Interesting.  I feel dumb for having never even heard of this before.



#3 zhang888

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 05:25 AM

Too early for production. Number of reasons:

 

1) Linux support only, both server and client, at this point, which signifficantly limits the number of users

 

2) Project is less than a year old and hasn't seen any production deployments yet, even among VPN services

 

3) Single developer without funding or business model, almost no community support, both code and money.

While the code contributions can be easily tracked (there are almost none), the money contributions are a little bit more difficult to track. But just from the project page Bitcoin address, we can see the developer got only 0.27 BTC during almost a year of development. That is about $300:

https://blockchain.info/address/1ASnTs4UjXKR8tHnLi9yG42n42hbFYV2um

 

However, zx2c4 is a great kernel hacker and developer, I personally tested Wireguard during the first days of its release and it's an interesting idea and implementation. Has a great potential for small internal employments at this point.

 

The project somewhat reminds me Nginx, the robust and efficient web server that started the same way.

Now it powers lots of most busiest websites, and it started as a hobby project with a single developer as well.

Until the community gave it a huge boost, somewhere around 2009 (5 years after initial release), the deployments were minimal, even though the performance advantages over Apache were clear.


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#4 zx2c4

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 05:07 PM

hasn't seen any production deployments yet

without funding
or business model

 

Is there a reason why you make these unsubstantiated claims? With what authority do you speak? What knowledge could you possibly have on these three points?



#5 Khariz

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 06:31 PM

 

hasn't seen any production deployments yet

without funding
or business model

 

Is there a reason why you make these unsubstantiated claims? With what authority do you speak? What knowledge could you possibly have on these three points?

 

How about you just correct him with correct information?  I'm not saying you need to give us your exact numbers or project developers, but it would be just as easy to say "On the contrary, I have more than 100 projects in development and have raised over half a million dollars at this point", instead of "WTF are you talking about?"

 

Just my 2 cents.



#6 zhang888

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 08:12 PM

1) Based on the number of commercial VPN providers currently using it

2) A more clear funding transparency report would be nice to see - compared to donations to many other open source projects I find $300 very low.

More could be in PayPal, but again assuming only Linux and crypto enthusiasts mainly use the project the BTC donations is a good example.

3) Business model - clarify if you can. OpenVPN has a business model while still being open source. Same as many other projects.

This is how to sustain development and other costs. Almost same as point 2 - funding.


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#7 Nnyan

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 05:39 PM

I'm not an expert

 

Hey guys,

 

I was wondering now that your other competitors are actively integrating Wireguard into their offerings, when do you think you'll have something ready for your customers?

 

I'm not an expert but having one (or more) companies publish a guide on how to use Wireguard with their service doesn't count as "actively integrating".  It's not part of their offering just a guide.  They clearly state:

 

"Warning: WireGuard is still under active development and should be seen as experimental. Mullvad is providing this installation for test purposes and on a limited scale." 

 

Even on the Wireguard site it states:

 

About The Project Work in progress. WireGuard is not yet complete. You should not rely on this code. It has not undergone proper degrees of security auditing and the protocol is still subject to change. We're working toward a stable 1.0 release, but that time has not yet come. There are experimental snapshots tagged with "0.0.YYYYMMDD", but these should not be considered real releases and they may contain security vulnerabilities.

 

That to me tells me it should not be used in a production environment.  Want to test it?  Sure, go for it! I myself am thinking of testing it in a sandbox.  



#8 jugs

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 02:58 PM

I'm not an expert

 

Hey guys,

 

I was wondering now that your other competitors are actively integrating Wireguard into their offerings, when do you think you'll have something ready for your customers?

 

I'm not an expert but having one (or more) companies publish a guide on how to use Wireguard with their service doesn't count as "actively integrating".  It's not part of their offering just a guide.  They clearly state:

 

"Warning: WireGuard is still under active development and should be seen as experimental. Mullvad is providing this installation for test purposes and on a limited scale." 

 

Even on the Wireguard site it states:

 

About The Project Work in progress. WireGuard is not yet complete. You should not rely on this code. It has not undergone proper degrees of security auditing and the protocol is still subject to change. We're working toward a stable 1.0 release, but that time has not yet come. There are experimental snapshots tagged with "0.0.YYYYMMDD", but these should not be considered real releases and they may contain security vulnerabilities.

 

That to me tells me it should not be used in a production environment.  Want to test it?  Sure, go for it! I myself am thinking of testing it in a sandbox.  

 

I'm not sure what "actively integrating" means to you, but they are rolling it out for public test so they can figure out how to integrate it...



#9 SlipBetween

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 02:28 PM

Hey guys.  I've been seeing some other VPN providers working with wireguard, and the tech seems pretty solid and promising.  I was wondering if Air was possibly looking at working with it as well in the near future.  Thoughts?


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