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Well seems I was wrong, they affect datacenters too apparently and VPN providers. Also Perfect Privacy don't necessarily have to have agreed with logging, the law only wants log data on Russian citizens and gives a rats ass about people from Germany or Britain, if they don't know about Perfect Privacy they got no reason to take their servers.

Well one could be a bit cocky and cynical and perhaps say that "reason" isn't even a theme here, since if it was, there wouldn't be such laws to begin with. But you know, I imagine it's much like with when the NSA says they won't collect information on their own citizens. However if during the dragnet surveillance a couple of their own citizens do get their data swept up, that's an unfortunate accident.

 

The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it

I had to look this up. The NSA is not a company. They are in fact a legitimate part of the United States Government.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Agency

 

And those Constitutional protections ceased to exist with the "Patriot Act".


Debugging is at least twice as hard as writing the program in the first place.

So if you write your code as clever as you can possibly make it, then by definition you are not smart enough to debug it.

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I had to look this up. The NSA is not a company. They are in fact a legitimate part of the United States Government.

 

 

Well seems I was wrong, they affect datacenters too apparently and VPN providers. Also Perfect Privacy don't necessarily have to have agreed with logging, the law only wants log data on Russian citizens and gives a rats ass about people from Germany or Britain, if they don't know about Perfect Privacy they got no reason to take their servers.

Well one could be a bit cocky and cynical and perhaps say that "reason" isn't even a theme here, since if it was, there wouldn't be such laws to begin with. But you know, I imagine it's much like with when the NSA says they won't collect information on their own citizens. However if during the dragnet surveillance a couple of their own citizens do get their data swept up, that's an unfortunate accident.

 

The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Agency

 

And those Constitutional protections ceased to exist with the "Patriot Act".

 

I know it's not an actual company but didn't really know what else to call it. Also what is the "Patriot Act" ?

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I had to look this up. The NSA is not a company. They are in fact a legitimate part of the United States Government.

 

 

Well seems I was wrong, they affect datacenters too apparently and VPN providers. Also Perfect Privacy don't necessarily have to have agreed with logging, the law only wants log data on Russian citizens and gives a rats ass about people from Germany or Britain, if they don't know about Perfect Privacy they got no reason to take their servers.

Well one could be a bit cocky and cynical and perhaps say that "reason" isn't even a theme here, since if it was, there wouldn't be such laws to begin with. But you know, I imagine it's much like with when the NSA says they won't collect information on their own citizens. However if during the dragnet surveillance a couple of their own citizens do get their data swept up, that's an unfortunate accident.

 

The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Agency

 

And those Constitutional protections ceased to exist with the "Patriot Act".

I know it's not an actual company but didn't really know what else to call it. Also what is the "Patriot Act" ?

 

Patriot Act is something congress keeps passing that allows them to do whatever they want because "terrorism".  It's a serious repression of liberty and freedom yet most americans don't care because they think it makes us safer.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act

 

And since parts of that act have expired, it was replaced with another mockery of law called the USA Freedom act.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USA_Freedom_Act

 

Only the most idiotic of people can think that the name of the act does anything but defeat any legitimacy it could have.

"Uniting and Strengthening America by Fulfilling Rights and Ending Eavesdropping, Dragnet-collection and Online Monitoring Act." Yeah.

 

I wish I was making that up. It does exactly the opposite of what its name requires, but that is the name.


Debugging is at least twice as hard as writing the program in the first place.

So if you write your code as clever as you can possibly make it, then by definition you are not smart enough to debug it.

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I had to look this up. The NSA is not a company. They are in fact a legitimate part of the United States Government.

 

 

Well seems I was wrong, they affect datacenters too apparently and VPN providers. Also Perfect Privacy don't necessarily have to have agreed with logging, the law only wants log data on Russian citizens and gives a rats ass about people from Germany or Britain, if they don't know about Perfect Privacy they got no reason to take their servers.

Well one could be a bit cocky and cynical and perhaps say that "reason" isn't even a theme here, since if it was, there wouldn't be such laws to begin with. But you know, I imagine it's much like with when the NSA says they won't collect information on their own citizens. However if during the dragnet surveillance a couple of their own citizens do get their data swept up, that's an unfortunate accident.

 

The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Agency

 

And those Constitutional protections ceased to exist with the "Patriot Act".

 

I know it's not an actual company but didn't really know what else to call it. Also what is the "Patriot Act" ?

The reason I had to look it up is that for a very long time, the United States Postal Service was a part of the government, and recently it was made into a private company. (Likely because it was the only part of our government that involved money and actually made a profit.) So I figured they may have made the NSA a company for some reason.


Debugging is at least twice as hard as writing the program in the first place.

So if you write your code as clever as you can possibly make it, then by definition you are not smart enough to debug it.

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Well seems I was wrong, they affect datacenters too apparently and VPN providers. Also Perfect Privacy don't necessarily have to have agreed with logging, the law only wants log data on Russian citizens and gives a rats ass about people from Germany or Britain, if they don't know about Perfect Privacy they got no reason to take their servers.

Well one could be a bit cocky and cynical and perhaps say that "reason" isn't even a theme here, since if it was, there wouldn't be such laws to begin with. But you know, I imagine it's much like with when the NSA says they won't collect information on their own citizens. However if during the dragnet surveillance a couple of their own citizens do get their data swept up, that's an unfortunate accident.

 

The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it

Well as it happens, there's so many loopholes. They don't, for instance, have to *collect* it themselves, if they merely let one of their "intelligence partners" - another country - do the hard work. Then they simply swap datasets and call it "cooperation". It's a nifty way of side-stepping the law. There's many others. Often "oversight", not so much law, is what is mentioned as the counter-balance to all this collection. However as has been proven, oversight is often lacking and even if and when it's not, it won't mean things won't go wrong. Edward Snowden for instance, tried to tell his superiors about how wrong all the collection of data really was and he was silenced in a variety of ways. So while I get what you mean about there being differences, I think those differences are only skin-deep.


Moderators do not speak on behalf of AirVPN. Only the Official Staff account does. Please also do not run Tor Exit Servers behind AirVPN, thank you.
Did you make a guide or how-to for something? Then contact me to get it listed in my new user guide's Guides Section, so that the community can find it more easily.

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Well seems I was wrong, they affect datacenters too apparently and VPN providers. Also Perfect Privacy don't necessarily have to have agreed with logging, the law only wants log data on Russian citizens and gives a rats ass about people from Germany or Britain, if they don't know about Perfect Privacy they got no reason to take their servers.

Well one could be a bit cocky and cynical and perhaps say that "reason" isn't even a theme here, since if it was, there wouldn't be such laws to begin with. But you know, I imagine it's much like with when the NSA says they won't collect information on their own citizens. However if during the dragnet surveillance a couple of their own citizens do get their data swept up, that's an unfortunate accident.

 

The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it

Well as it happens, there's so many loopholes. They don't, for instance, have to *collect* it themselves, if they merely let one of their "intelligence partners" - another country - do the hard work. Then they simply swap datasets and call it "cooperation". It's a nifty way of side-stepping the law. There's many others. Often "oversight", not so much law, is what is mentioned as the counter-balance to all this collection. However as has been proven, oversight is often lacking and even if and when it's not, it won't mean things won't go wrong. Edward Snowden for instance, tried to tell his superiors about how wrong all the collection of data really was and he was silenced in a variety of ways. So while I get what you mean about there being differences, I think those differences are only skin-deep.

 

I've read your post a few times over and one part confuse me, what differences are you refering to? I didn't say anything about differences

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Well seems I was wrong, they affect datacenters too apparently and VPN providers. Also Perfect Privacy don't necessarily have to have agreed with logging, the law only wants log data on Russian citizens and gives a rats ass about people from Germany or Britain, if they don't know about Perfect Privacy they got no reason to take their servers.

Well one could be a bit cocky and cynical and perhaps say that "reason" isn't even a theme here, since if it was, there wouldn't be such laws to begin with. But you know, I imagine it's much like with when the NSA says they won't collect information on their own citizens. However if during the dragnet surveillance a couple of their own citizens do get their data swept up, that's an unfortunate accident.

 

The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it

Well as it happens, there's so many loopholes. They don't, for instance, have to *collect* it themselves, if they merely let one of their "intelligence partners" - another country - do the hard work. Then they simply swap datasets and call it "cooperation". It's a nifty way of side-stepping the law. There's many others. Often "oversight", not so much law, is what is mentioned as the counter-balance to all this collection. However as has been proven, oversight is often lacking and even if and when it's not, it won't mean things won't go wrong. Edward Snowden for instance, tried to tell his superiors about how wrong all the collection of data really was and he was silenced in a variety of ways. So while I get what you mean about there being differences, I think those differences are only skin-deep.

 

I've read your post a few times over and one part confuse me, what differences are you refering to? I didn't say anything about differences

"The difference is NSA is an american company and they have those constitution stuff that is to protect their privacy so if the NSA collects their data it goes against that, there is none of that here like I wrote above the law is because if people do something here with logs they can find whoever did it". <---- Exact quote.


Debugging is at least twice as hard as writing the program in the first place.

So if you write your code as clever as you can possibly make it, then by definition you are not smart enough to debug it.

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"We think it’s because we are the most outspoken and only verified no-log VPN provider"

 

What's this? A wet dream?

What kind of reputable company would include this piece of shitty advertisement into a public statement? Shot themselves in the foot with that one, if you ask me.

 

There were a few guys around here asking for a russian server. I invite you to step forward.

 

As one of those individuals i would like to formally apologize. It seemed like a good idea before this, but recent events verify the necessity of AirVPN's stance on servers in Russia and that of servers in any other country where users private data is at risk of infiltration at any given moment.

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I didn't believe that "official" story, so I went out to check.

During my last check, which was asked by some of the members, their RU servers were colocated

with a very good, but expensive provider called RETN, at 185.22.183.0/24.

And when I say expensive I mean it, we are talking about around $400 USD for a 1Gbit 95-percentile line.

This is an acceptable price for businesses, and RETN are one of the top Tier-1 providers in Eastern Europe

so there is no place to complain. You actually get what you are paying for. But for a VPN company that is high.

 

Then, I assume some months ago since this is what my records show, they moved to PinSPB.ru, likely because

of the prices at RETN. PIN is a good provider, but sometimes unreliable and expensive, since many malware spreaders

and spammers chose to use them as well, and they can afford the price. This is why PIN don't have any special deals of

some kind, you pay a minimum of 150$ per server, with a 100Mbit line. The good news is that you can host and transit

anything you like, as long as is in the sane boundaries, i.e. no child abuse and terror. All that after PinSPB started charging

additional 250$ for flat unmetered 1Gbit, which now makes more sense to me why they canceled the entire deal.

Since me and my clients have a few ISP services from PIN as well (traffic transit) I asked the owner what what the

story with PIA. He said that the after mentioned services on the IPs I quoted are free again, and there were

no seizures or anything alike. Just a simple termination of contract with unpaid future invoices.

 

So that was a nice attempt to cut off a bandwidth expensive country and write a nice marketing post about

how "we are so caring about your privacy" fluff, which may be true to some extent, but that was not what

made them leave the Russian nodes. At least now you can buy a server as an International customer, pay

anonymously, and no one will ask you for any details or traffic whatsoever. The laws are for residential ISPs

if you read them carefully, when you are a datacenter, you can do pretty much whatever you want (with the

right peering partners) and no one can actually know what you are doing or whom you are selling to.


Occasional moderator, sometimes BOFH. Opinions are my own, except when my wife disagrees.

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I didn't believe that "official" story, so I went out to check.

During my last check, which was asked by some of the members, their RU servers were colocated

with a very good, but expensive provider called RETN, at 185.22.183.0/24.

Then, I assume some months ago since this is what my records show, they moved to PinSPB.ru,

a good provider, but sometimes unreliable and expensive, since many malware spreads and spammers

chose to use them as well, and they can afford the price. All that after PinSPB started charging additional

250$ for flat unmetered 1Gbit, which now makes more sense to me why they canceled the entire deal.

Since me and my clients a few services from them as well (traffic transit) I asked the owner what what the

story with PIA. He said that the after mentioned services on the IPs I quoted are free again, and there were

no seizures or anything alike. Just a simple termination of contract with unpaid future invoices.

 

So that was a nice attempt to cut off a bandwidth expensive country and write a nice marketing post about

how "we are so caring about your privacy" fluff, which may be true to some extent, but that was not what

made them leave the Russian nodes. At least now you can buy a server as an International customer, pay

anonymously, and no one will ask you for any details or traffic whatsoever. The laws are for residential ISPs

if you read them carefully, when you are a datacenter, you can do pretty much whatever you want (with the

right peering partners) and no one can actually know what you are doing or whom you are selling to.

Hahaha, that's both sad and hilarious at the same time. Thanks for digging it up zhang.


Moderators do not speak on behalf of AirVPN. Only the Official Staff account does. Please also do not run Tor Exit Servers behind AirVPN, thank you.
Did you make a guide or how-to for something? Then contact me to get it listed in my new user guide's Guides Section, so that the community can find it more easily.

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I didn't believe that "official" story, so I went out to check.

During my last check, which was asked by some of the members, their RU servers were colocated

with a very good, but expensive provider called RETN, at 185.22.183.0/24.

And when I say expensive I mean it, we are talking about around $400 USD for a 1Gbit 95-percentile line.

This is an acceptable price for businesses, and RETN are one of the top Tier-1 providers in Eastern Europe

so there is no place to complain. You actually get what you are paying for. But for a VPN company that is high.

 

Then, I assume some months ago since this is what my records show, they moved to PinSPB.ru, likely because

of the prices at RETN. PIN is a good provider, but sometimes unreliable and expensive, since many malware spreaders

and spammers chose to use them as well, and they can afford the price. This is why PIN don't have any special deals of

some kind, you pay a minimum of 150$ per server, with a 100Mbit line. The good news is that you can host and transit

anything you like, as long as is in the sane boundaries, i.e. no child abuse and terror. All that after PinSPB started charging

additional 250$ for flat unmetered 1Gbit, which now makes more sense to me why they canceled the entire deal.

Since me and my clients have a few ISP services from PIN as well (traffic transit) I asked the owner what what the

story with PIA. He said that the after mentioned services on the IPs I quoted are free again, and there were

no seizures or anything alike. Just a simple termination of contract with unpaid future invoices.

 

So that was a nice attempt to cut off a bandwidth expensive country and write a nice marketing post about

how "we are so caring about your privacy" fluff, which may be true to some extent, but that was not what

made them leave the Russian nodes. At least now you can buy a server as an International customer, pay

anonymously, and no one will ask you for any details or traffic whatsoever. The laws are for residential ISPs

if you read them carefully, when you are a datacenter, you can do pretty much whatever you want (with the

right peering partners) and no one can actually know what you are doing or whom you are selling to.

 

why did PIA send an email to customers urging them to update their client and config files if there was no seizure?

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1) Because this is how you make a story sound very truthful, that's a very minimal magician "Do you see? my hands are empty" line.

2) PIN doesn't play with you, when you miss an invoice they will "seize" your servers. Format the drives and allocate it to the next

customer on the next day.

 

Some ads of PIN:

 

PINSPb.ru — Bulletproof abuse protected dedicated servers in Russian Federation

 

PINSPb.ru is an Internet and hosting provider, acting actively on the market of Internet and hosting services since 2006. We put our dedicated-servers and places for colocation at our clients disposal in our own Data Center in Saint-Petersburg, Russian Federation.

All abuses are dealt with under the law of Russian Federation.
All requests from foreign investigation agencies will be ignored.


Occasional moderator, sometimes BOFH. Opinions are my own, except when my wife disagrees.

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So that was a nice attempt to cut off a bandwidth expensive country and write a nice marketing post about

how "we are so caring about your privacy" fluff, which may be true to some extent, but that was not what

made them leave the Russian nodes. At least now you can buy a server as an International customer, pay

anonymously, and no one will ask you for any details or traffic whatsoever. The laws are for residential ISPs

if you read them carefully, when you are a datacenter, you can do pretty much whatever you want (with the

right peering partners) and no one can actually know what you are doing or whom you are selling to.

 

So I was right afterall

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1) Because this is how you make a story sound very truthful, that's a very minimal magician "Do you see? my hands are empty" line.

2) PIN doesn't play with you, when you miss an invoice they will "seize" your servers. Format the drives and allocate it to the next

customer on the next day.

 

Some ads of PIN:

 

 

PINSPb.ru — Bulletproof abuse protected dedicated servers in Russian Federation

 

PINSPb.ru is an Internet and hosting provider, acting actively on the market of Internet and hosting services since 2006. We put our dedicated-servers and places for colocation at our clients disposal in our own Data Center in Saint-Petersburg, Russian Federation.

 

All abuses are dealt with under the law of Russian Federation.

All requests from foreign investigation agencies will be ignored.

If what you say is the truth, don't you think, they could have just moved to another provider? 

 

Also, don't you think PINSPb have reasons to say their servers weren't confiscated because if they were, the spammers and others who use their servers will move away and they lose business? and the government cannot use PINSPb as a honeypot?

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1) Because this is how you make a story sound very truthful, that's a very minimal magician "Do you see? my hands are empty" line.

2) PIN doesn't play with you, when you miss an invoice they will "seize" your servers. Format the drives and allocate it to the next

customer on the next day.

 

Some ads of PIN:

 

 

PINSPb.ru — Bulletproof abuse protected dedicated servers in Russian Federation

 

PINSPb.ru is an Internet and hosting provider, acting actively on the market of Internet and hosting services since 2006. We put our dedicated-servers and places for colocation at our clients disposal in our own Data Center in Saint-Petersburg, Russian Federation.

 

All abuses are dealt with under the law of Russian Federation.

All requests from foreign investigation agencies will be ignored.

If what you say is the truth, don't you think, they could have just moved to another provider? 

 

Also, don't you think PINSPb have reasons to say their servers weren't confiscated because if they were, the spammers and others who use their servers will move away and they lose business? and the government cannot use PINSPb as a honeypot?

 

Tbh, there is a chance either of them is lying or both, however personally I'm inclined to believe PIA are the ones lying due to some experiences I've had with them.

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Tbh, there is a chance either of them is lying or both, however personally I'm inclined to believe PIA are the ones lying due to some experiences I've had with them.

 

Doesn't matter, if you ask me. Trust in both the RuNet providers and PIA is already broken. The best you can still do is operating a rerouting server to watch local TV or something.


» I am not an AirVPN team member. All opinions are my own and are not to be considered official. Only the AirVPN Staff account should be viewed as such.

» The forums is a place where you can ask questions to the community. You are not entitled to guaranteed answer times. Answer quality may vary, too. If you need professional support, please create tickets.

» If you're new, take some time to read LZ1's New User Guide to AirVPN. On questions, use the search function first. On errors, search for the error message instead.

» If you choose to create a new thread, keep in mind that we don't know your setup. Give info about it. Never forget the OpenVPN logs or, for Eddie, the support file (Logs > lifebelt icon).

» The community kindly asks you to not set up Tor exit relays when connected to AirVPN. Their IP addresses are subject to restrictions and these are relayed to all users of the affected servers.

 

» Furthermore, I propose that your paranoia is to be destroyed. If you overdo privacy, chances are you will be unique amond the mass again.

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Tbh, there is a chance either of them is lying or both, however personally I'm inclined to believe PIA are the ones lying due to some experiences I've had with them.

 

Doesn't matter, if you ask me. Trust in both the RuNet providers and PIA is already broken. The best you can still do is operating a rerouting server to watch local TV or something.

 

Already am

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Tbh, there is a chance either of them is lying or both, however personally I'm inclined to believe PIA are the ones lying due to some experiences I've had with them.

 

Doesn't matter, if you ask me. Trust in both the RuNet providers and PIA is already broken. The best you can still do is operating a rerouting server to watch local TV or something.

 

I don't know how your trust in PIA is broken. Since they actually have court documents as proof to back up their no logging, while AirVPN doesn't. You people have to remember that PIA has 3k+ servers compared to the 130 servers AirVPN has. I really don't think a single location in Russia is going to make them go broke, when they still have servers in AU. Bandwidth costs a lot more there then in Russia. It's pretty clear that for a mod, zhang888 really doesn't know the situation in Russia. They are asking providers and companies to give up encryption keys and that effects non-russian citizens. I actually liked AirVPN, but it seems they are turning into cryptostorm by spreading bullshit about other providers with no proof to back anything up. I really don't see how they can allow a mod to destroy the AirVPN name like that.

 

Falsely accusing AirVPN of spreading BS will get you nowhere.  Or, can you point me to where AirVPN staff have said anything about PIA?  What a moderator did do is retell a story of a personal nature.  Perhaps you'd also like to call him a liar?

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I don't know how your trust in PIA is broken

 

Ah, right. I never trusted them in the first place, so if nothing's there, nothing can break.

 

Since they actually have court documents as proof to back up their no logging

 

I will acknowledge your statement and believe it if those documents are publically viewable. So far I've not seen any of them, neither on their website nor on Reddit reporting about it nor in any news articles.

 

It's pretty clear that for a mod, zhang888 really doesn't know the situation in Russia

 

zhang is a special case, he is not an employee of Air.


» I am not an AirVPN team member. All opinions are my own and are not to be considered official. Only the AirVPN Staff account should be viewed as such.

» The forums is a place where you can ask questions to the community. You are not entitled to guaranteed answer times. Answer quality may vary, too. If you need professional support, please create tickets.

» If you're new, take some time to read LZ1's New User Guide to AirVPN. On questions, use the search function first. On errors, search for the error message instead.

» If you choose to create a new thread, keep in mind that we don't know your setup. Give info about it. Never forget the OpenVPN logs or, for Eddie, the support file (Logs > lifebelt icon).

» The community kindly asks you to not set up Tor exit relays when connected to AirVPN. Their IP addresses are subject to restrictions and these are relayed to all users of the affected servers.

 

» Furthermore, I propose that your paranoia is to be destroyed. If you overdo privacy, chances are you will be unique amond the mass again.

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This article is referring to the thesis zhang888 made in this thread:

 

http://best10vpn.com/is-private-internet-access-broke/

 

But the author falsely claims that it was the user "Go557a83nk" who brought it up, while in reality it was zhang888. Bad inquiry by best10vpn.

 

Regards

 

Fox

 

I did not know PIA was having other problems.  That fills in some of the story.  I just wish my name weren't used in their article. 

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Proof they gave up anything besides a blanket "we log nothing" reply?

 

“A subpoena was sent to London Trust Media and the only information they could provide is that the cluster of IP addresses being used was from the east coast of the United States,” the FBI’s complaint reads.

 

https://torrentfreak.com/vpn-providers-no-logging-claims-tested-in-fbi-case-160312/ 

 

That is what I found, if you read the article yeah they told them that they do not log, but if you do NOT have anything saying who is connected RIGHT now the servers wouldn't work, I thought you'd understand that and fact is when they got that subpoena being an American company they HAD to handover what they had, which was probably just connected right now logs which is in realtime and once someone disconnects theres no evidence they ever were connected but that doesn't mean they didn't give what they had, even if what they had was practically nothing.

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Proof they gave up anything besides a blanket "we log nothing" reply?

 

“A subpoena was sent to London Trust Media and the only information they could provide is that the cluster of IP addresses being used was from the east coast of the United States,” the FBI’s complaint reads.

 

https://torrentfreak.com/vpn-providers-no-logging-claims-tested-in-fbi-case-160312/ 

 

That is what I found, if you read the article yeah they told them that they do not log, but if you do NOT have anything saying who is connected RIGHT now the servers wouldn't work, I thought you'd understand that and fact is when they got that subpoena being an American company they HAD to handover what they had, which was probably just connected right now logs which is in realtime and once someone disconnects theres no evidence they ever were connected but that doesn't mean they didn't give what they had, even if what they had was practically nothing.

Just finished reading the article. The FBI had a fuck ton of evidence on this cunt to begin with, their attempt at PIA was just fluff to bolster their claims further. I mean, once they knew he had the VPN all they had to do was check the ISP logs to see if he connected to the offending ip/server at the time the emails were sent. Just goes to show you that when fuckers like this make mistakes and slip up, VPN data is almost irrelevant because of all the other evidence they have to begin with.

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