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DNS leaks and how to fix them

dns leaks

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#1 mrano

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 10:21 PM

I thought I'd share some links I've found to check for DNS leaks:

 

 

http://www.dnsleaktest.com

http://ipleak.net/

 

 

If you see your real IP or another IP (other than the one that you are connected to by VPN) then you have a DNS leak.

 

You should fix it by setting static IP and DNS server settings on your network adapter.

 

I've written a step-by-step guide for people unfamiliar with network and IP settings.

 

 

Instructions on how to make your IP settings static for Windows 7:

 

You might be asked to elevate system priviledges or authenticate as Admin while you perform these steps, just allow it all.

 

Click on the network icon on the taskbar (the lower right screen near the clock) -> Click on "Network and sharing center" -> Click on "Change adapter settings" on the menu to the left.

 

You need to know your router's network settings before you continue: Right click on your network adapter (Local area connection if you're connected by a LAN cable or Wireless network connection if WiFi) and choose "Status" -> Click on "Details...". There you should notice your "IPv4 Address", "IPv4 Subnet Mask", "IPv4 Default Gateway" and "IPv4 DNS Server". Click "Close" and again "Close".

 

Right click on your network adapter and choose "Properties" -> Click on "Internet Protocol Version 4" (don't un-check it) and click "Properties".

 

Select the "Use the following IP address" button.

 

IP address: When you noticed your "IPv4 Address" in the "Details" screen earler, it might have looked like this: 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1. This was an IP address assigned by the DHCP pool on your router and happens automatically. You might think to put in the same IP address as you saw in the "Details" window but if you do that, the IP address might be assigned to another computer while your computer is turned off. You should choose an IP address that's much higher than your current IP address so it will be unlikely that another computer will get the same IP address from the DHCP pool.

 

When you put in the "IP address" on the "Properties" screen, you should put in the same first three numbers (e.g. 192.168.0.) and then the last number should be a random number between 100 and 250. It doesn't really matter what number you choose, you are just choosing a number that should be unused on your local LAN. If you get an error about an "IP address conflict", you should choose another last number in the IP address.

 

 

Subnet mask: Copy the "IPv4 Subnet Mask" from earlier.

 

Default gateway: Copy the "IPv4 Default Gateway" from earlier. This is the IP address of your router.

 

Preferred DNS server: Put in "10.4.0.1". This is AirVPN's DNS server.

 

Alternate DNS server: Put in "10.5.0.1". AirVPN's DNS server.

 

 

 

What you have done here is tell Windows to only use AirVPN's DNS servers instead of your routers (or ISP's) DNS servers. If you are not connected to an AirVPN server, you cannot go to the internet unless you put in your normal DNS server settings that you should have noticed in the "Details" screen before (IPv4 DNS Server above).

 

You can also put AirVPN's website IP address in your "Hosts" file. This means that you can get to Airvpn.org to download a config without constantly changing your DNS server settings. Here's how you do it:

 

Open notepad.exe as Admin (Right click -> Run as Administrator). Go to File -> Open. You need to navigate to this folder: "C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc" and it might involve changing folder settings ("Organize" -> "Folder and search options") to show hidden files (View -> Show hidden files). The folder might appear to be empty but change the document type from "Text Document" to "All files" and then open the file called "hosts".

 

Put in this lines at the bottom:

 


95.211.138.143 airvpn.org

 

Then save the file as "hosts" and overwrite the old one. If you didn't run notepad.exe as Admin then you can't save the file.

 

Hopefully this guide will help people. If there are any questions, just ask!



#2 Cheebamaster

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 07:09 PM

Wow thanks for this...i ran the test and it showed 3 dns leaks. I'm actually rather annoyed. Does this mean that I haven't been at all anonymous when using airvpn since I had the leaks? I don't understand why this isn't explained when you pay for the service. Seems like a pain in the butt to do this every time I log into airvpn.

 

Is there a way to easily connect and disconnect? Or do I have to manually do this every time?



#3 Staff

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 03:09 PM

Wow thanks for this...i ran the test and it showed 3 dns leaks. I'm actually rather annoyed. Does this mean that I haven't been at all anonymous when using airvpn since I had the leaks? I don't understand why this isn't explained when you pay for the service. Seems like a pain in the butt to do this every time I log into airvpn.

Is there a way to easily connect and disconnect? Or do I have to manually do this every time?


Hello!

We beg to differ, this is very well explained in the welcome e-mail, in the forum (in something like dozens of threads) and in the How-To guide. A DNS leak is a typical Windows problem (the only OS which lacks the concept of global DNS), guides to fix it abound (please browse the forum, hint: look at this very same thread...), please see our external web site http://ipleaknet.net

Suggested fix is once and for all, you don't need to re-apply it over.

Kind regards

#4 Staff

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 03:11 PM

I thought I'd share some links I've found to check for DNS leaks:

 

 

http://www.dnsleaktest.com

http://ipleak.net/

 

Thanks! ipleak.net is run by us, do you like it?

 

Kind regards



#5 mrano

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:49 PM

Wow thanks for this...i ran the test and it showed 3 dns leaks. I'm actually rather annoyed. Does this mean that I haven't been at all anonymous when using airvpn since I had the leaks? I don't understand why this isn't explained when you pay for the service. Seems like a pain in the butt to do this every time I log into airvpn.

 

Is there a way to easily connect and disconnect? Or do I have to manually do this every time?

 

It doesn't have to mean that you haven't been anonymous. It means that while your traffic was still going through AirVPN's servers, you have been using your ISP's DNS resolver instead of AirVPN's. Web sites that are specially crafted to test your DNS servers like the ones I mentioned in my first post might grab your real IP address or your ISP could be logging your DNS requests. You shouldn't worry too much unless you are very paranoid.

 

Thanks! ipleak.net is run by us, do you like it?

 

Kind regards

 

Yes I like it. The two sites I posted are the ones I've seen mentioned most often on this forum.



#6 Staff

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 06:22 PM

Hello!

 

Just as a side-note, you don't need to assign a static IP address to your network card to prevent DNS leaks (and in some circumstances it might also create issues if your network is handled by a DHCP server), just set static DNS IP addresses 10.4.0.1 and 10.5.0.1, which are reachable regardless of the Air VPN server port you connect to.

 

Kind regards



#7 mcampbell

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 11:05 PM

I have a Mac (OSX 10.8) using TunnelBlick, and ran both links and they showed that there was no leakage, yet I did not use the alpha OSX airvpn client.  So I'm assuming my DNS is not leaking, but wanted to make sure.  Is TunnelBlick known to "work correctly" (or known not to)?   The links make me feel a little better about it, but wanted to confirm.

 

The ipleak.net site shows 108.59.8.183 for both my detected IP and detected DNS - this means no leaking, right?



#8 Staff

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 11:12 PM

I have a Mac (OSX 10.8) using TunnelBlick, and ran both links and they showed that there was no leakage, yet I did not use the alpha OSX airvpn client.  So I'm assuming my DNS is not leaking, but wanted to make sure.  Is TunnelBlick known to "work correctly" (or known not to)?   The links make me feel a little better about it, but wanted to confirm.

 

The ipleak.net site shows 108.59.8.183 for both my detected IP and detected DNS - this means no leaking, right?

 

Hello!

 

Yes, Tunnelblick executes scripts to accept our OpenVPN servers DNS push. On top of that, maybe it's useful to underline again that DNS leaks are a WINDOWS problem ONLY (Windows historically lacks the concept of global DNS).

 

Kind regards



#9 natZONE

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 08:53 PM

On Windows 8 Pro x64, I use the freeware NetSetMan with different profiles for VPN and connections without VPN. For Air VPN connection with UDP port 53, I let NetSetMan register 10.8.0.1 as DNS address for both TAP-Windows Adapter V9 and WiFi interface. Under these settings, all DNS leaks are gone once and forever.



#10 NaDre

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 05:40 PM

I am surprised that there is no mention on this forum that it possible to avoid DNS leaks (when using Windows) by running a DNS server (i.e. BIND) on your PC.
 
I do not usually use the VPN interface as my default gateway. At times I need my full bandwidth and the lower latency of my real IP connection. I just use the VPN as my default gateway when I want access to geo-blocked content. And when I do use the VPN, I just select a server in the country in question. Having the DNS server for my real IP interface set to 10.4.0.1 would be a problem when I am not using the VPN. And I do not want to have to manually reconfigure things when I start the VPN!
 
I should caution here that what I do may not play well with AirVPN's automatic "double-hop" stuff.
 
What I do is run BIND:
 
https://www.isc.org/software/bind
 
I run it as a "caching, recursive" name server on my PC. It will use whatever the current default gateway IP interface is to directly access whatever authoritative DNS servers are needed in order to resolve a domain name. Instead of setting the DNS server for my IP interfaces to 10.4.0.1, I set them (real and VPN) to 127.0.0.1 (the "localhost" address).
 
Getting BIND installed and configured is not hard:
 
1) On the BIND download page I identified above, click on the "Windows Download" link to download the zip file.
 
2) Unzip it somewhere.
 
3) Read the file "readme1st.txt" for detailed instructions.
 
4) Run "BINDInstall.exe" to do the installation. I changed the install directory to "C:\BIND" instead of "C:\WINDOWS\system32\dns" because there are lots of great tools in BIND and I do not want to be digging around in "C:\WINDOWS\system32". I used "NT AUTHORITY\LocalService" as the "Server Account Name". Do not start the Windows service yet.
 
5) In "C:\BIND\etc" I added the file "named.conf" containing this:

options {
  directory "C:\BIND\etc";
  listen-on { 127.0.0.1; };
};

So it is listening only on the localhost interface.
 
6) Start the "ISC BIND" service by first using Windows Explorer to access "Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Administrative Tools", and then running "Services". You will not need to do this again because it is configured as "Startup Type Automatic".
 
7) Now follow the steps provided in the first post in this thread by mrano to set the the DNS server for your IP interfaces.
 
7.1) Use Windows Explorer to access "Control Panel\Network and Internet\Network and Sharing Center". Then click "Change adapter settings" to see all of your adapters.
 
7.2) Your real IP interface is probably "Local Area Connection" and your VPN interface is probably "Local Area Connection 2". I have two VPN interfaces so I also have "Local Area Connection 3".
 
7.3) For each interface do "Properties", select "Internet Protocol Version 4 ...", do "Properties" again, check "Use the following DNS server addresses", set "Preferred DNS server" to 127.0.0.1. I have nothing in "Alternate DNS server".

 

===

 

UPDATE for point 7:

 

You can make these changes from the command line (as "Administrator") more quickly using something like this:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" static 127.0.0.1
netsh interface ip set dns "Wireless Network Connection" static 127.0.0.1
netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection 2" static 127.0.0.1
netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection 3" static 127.0.0.1
netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection 4" static 127.0.0.1 

And you can restore thing back to using DHCP (the usual thing) from the command line (as "Administrator") more quickly using something like this:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" dhcp
netsh interface ip set dns "Wireless Network Connection" dhcp
netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection 2" dhcp
netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection 3" dhcp
netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection 4" dhcp

Any IP interfaces that do not exist above will just be ignored.

 

===

 

Now you can retry the DNS leak tests:
 
http://www.dnsleaktest.com/
http://ipleak.net/
 
When I run ipleak.net, "Detected DNS Address" is the same as "Your IP Address".
 
When I run dnsleaktest.com, it detects only one DNS server, and its address is the same as my current IP address (either real or exit address of my AirVPN server).
 
=====
 
UPDATE:
 
I thought I would mention one other BIND configuration that I sometimes use. Sometimes I want to temporarily use the AirVPN DNS server. So I changed the "named.conf" file in "C:\BIND\etc" so that it looks like this:

options {
  directory "C:\BIND\etc";
  listen-on { 127.0.0.1; };
  include "forward.conf";
};

Then "forward.conf" is usually an empty file (0 length) so that I will not use the AirVPN DNS server. When I want to flip over to the AirVPN server I change it so that it looks like this:

  forward first;
  forwarders { 10.4.0.1; };

And then I restart the "named" service using:

net stop named & net start named

I have two command scripts (".bat" files) to do this. Each copies the desired version of "forward.conf" into place and then restarts the "named" service.
 
UPDATE 2:
 
I see that the BIND page has been changed a bit, and asks for an E-mail address. You do not have to provide this to download. The file you want (as of July 15, 2013) is "BIND 9.9.3-P1 (zip)"

UPDATE 3:

It occurred to me that I should have provided a couple of simple sample Windows command scripts to do the switching of the BIND from being a resolver to a forwarder and vice versa.

For information on writing ".bat" scripts see:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb490954.aspx

If you need a text editor that is (much) better than Notepad, try this:

http://notepad-plus-plus.org/

All of the files described below go into "C:\BIND\etc".

Set up "named.conf" as:

options {
  directory "C:\BIND\etc";
  listen-on { 127.0.0.1; };
  include "forward.conf";
};

Set up "forward_none.conf" as an empty file.
 
Set up "forward_AirVPN.conf" as:

forward first;
forwarders { 10.4.0.1; };

Set up "DNS_mine.bat" as:

@pushd "%~p0"
copy /Y forward_none.conf forward.conf
net stop named & net start named
@popd
@pause

Set up "DNS_AirVPN.bat" as:

@pushd "%~p0"
copy /Y forward_AirVPN.conf forward.conf
net stop named & net start named
copy /Y forward_none.conf forward.conf
@popd
@pause

The .bat files must be run as "Administrator". Right mouse-click on the script to see the option to do this. Or you can set up short cuts for them and set "Run as administrator" in the "Advanced" properies for them.
 
I have attached a file "BIND-etc.zip" which contains a folder called "etc" with these files inside it.
 
UPDATE 4:
 
After providing the sample files, and attaching the zip file, it occurred to me that there is one more command that folks may (it is not crucial) want to add after the name server is restarted, to get Windows to flush its DNS cache:
 

ipconfig /flushdns

This is not in the files in the attached zip file.

Attached Files



#11 budweiser

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:50 PM

What did it for me:

 

I was still experiencing leaks with the Comodo solution, but after:

 

  1. turning teredo tunneling off and
  2. IPV6 off in the registry and in the network settings, i am without leaks. Please watch out, the Local Area Properties Windows may have IPV6 selected even AFTER you turned off IPV6 from the registry. Please do it manually. Yes, It is Windows :)

Greetings!



#12 johnyboy

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 01:21 PM

I have always experienced DNS leaks with all the VPNs I have tried, so I usually go to http://www.opennicproject.org/ and configure my rooter with the DNS servers given in this page which are the nearest to the VPN location. This is an anonymous DNS service.

 

But after reading this thread I suppose I rather use  10.4.0.1 and 10.5.0.1 servers as these are advised my AirVpn staff.

 

 

 

 



#13 NaDre

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 08:18 PM

You can switch the DNS server for your native IP interface "on the fly" rather than permanently. This allows you to use your original IP interface when the VPN is down.

If you are connected to a router, then your native (i.e. non-VPN/original) IP interface is probably "Local Area Connection". If you are using wifi it may be something like "Wireless Network Connection". You will be able to see what the name of your interface is if you use this command:

ipconfig /all

You need to do this at a "command prompt", which you can bring up using "Start/All Programs/Accessories/Command Prompt". You can set up copy and paste editing in a command prompt by right-clicking on the title bar, where it says "Command Prompt". This should produce something like this:

C:\Users\user>ipconfig /all
...
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:
   ...
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : TAP-Windows Adapter V9
   ...
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 10.4.??.?2(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.252
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : October-15-13 9:11:06 PM
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : October-15-14 9:11:19 PM
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.4.??.?1
   ...
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.4.0.1
   ...
Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Atheros AR5BWB222 Wireless Network Adapter
   ...
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
   ...
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet
   ...
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.63(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : October-15-13 9:02:29 PM
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : October-23-13 9:02:33 AM
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.254
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.254
   ...
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.254
                                       ??.???.???.?
   ...

In this case WiFi is not being used, and the real IP interface is "Local Area Connection". The IP interface with the "Description" value of "TAP-Windows Adapter V9" is the IP interface that OpenVPN uses. This is often (but not always) "Local Area Connection 2", as it is in this case.

 

You can determine the correct DNS server to use (e.g. if you are using UDP on port 443 then use 10.4.0.1) from this page:
 
https://airvpn.org/specs/
 

You can see what the DNS is set to for all interfaces using this command:

netsh interface ip show dns

This should produce something like this:

C:\Users\user>netsh interface ip show dns
...
Configuration for interface "Local Area Connection 2"
    DNS servers configured through DHCP:  10.4.0.1
    Register with which suffix:           Primary only
...
Configuration for interface "Wireless Network Connection"
    DNS servers configured through DHCP:  None
    Register with which suffix:           Both primary and connection-specific

Configuration for interface "Local Area Connection"
    DNS servers configured through DHCP:  192.168.1.254
                                          ??.???.???.1
    Register with which suffix:           Primary only
...

So the DNS server for the VPN connection is "10.4.0.1" in this case.

 

The DNS for the VPN interface should already be set in accordance with the link above. What we want is for the DNS server for the "Local Area Connection" (or "Wireless Network Connection" if using WiFi) to be the same as for the VPN connection.


Assuming that the interface name is "Local Area Connection", and that the appropriate AirVPN DNS server is 10.4.0.1, then when the VPN has come up, you can run this commmand as administrator:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" static 10.4.0.1

You need to do this at an "administrator command prompt" that has administrator privilege, which you can bring up using "Start/All Programs/Accessories/Command Prompt, right-click, Run as Administrator". You can set up copy and paste editing in a command prompt by right-clicking on the title bar, where it says "Administrator Command Prompt".

 

That has taken care of DNS leaks. Now when the VPN goes down, assuming you let DHCP normally configure your DNS, you can run this command as administrator:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" dhcp

And you are back to normal.

For convenience, you can put these commands into ".bat" scripts and create short cuts to them with the "Run as administrator" property set. Add a "pause" statement at the end so the window will stay open for you to see the results.

 

If you want to automate this, you can use an "up" script and "down" script with the OpenVPN connection.

 

NOTE:

 

In what follows, it is assumed that you are using the GUI wrapper program (OpenVPN-GUI) for OpenVPN that comes with OpenVPN, rather than the AirVPN GUI wrapper program. And that you have generated, downloaded and installed the ".ovpn" configuration files that this needs.

 

Towards this end add these lines to each ".ovpn" configuration file (using AirVPN's Configuration Generator for example):

script-security 2
up '_up.bat'
down '_down.bat'

Then in the same folder where the ".ovpn" files are add the file "_up.bat" containing this:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" static 10.4.0.1

And also in the same folder where the ".ovpn" files are add the file "_down.bat" containing this:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" dhcp

To check that your set up is working, use AirVPN's DNS leak test site:

http://ipleak.net/

For documentation on the "netsh" command see:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb490943.aspx

For documentation on directives that go into ".ovpn" files see:

https://community.openvpn.net/openvpn/wiki/Openvpn23ManPage

 

UPDATE:

 

It is possible to integrate into this scheme a very simple approach to blocking all traffic if the VPN connection fails. See this:

 

https://airvpn.org/topic/9797-blocking-non-vpn-traffic-without-firewall-using-routing-router/?p=11512



#14 Gynko

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 06:28 PM

I am a noob ^^.

I tried the 2 website to check on my leaks, and there are some ( i got my normal ip and the one from the server i am connected to aith air)

 

I am on windows 8 64. My computer is plugged by ethernet on my router.

 

When i am in my network connection, i have:

1*ethernet (realtek)

2*local area connection(Tap windows adapter9)

 

Which one is the one i am supposed to modify ?

 

EDIT:

After trying all the possibilities, it was my ethernet card. Tap windows adapter seem to be the thing created by the airvpn program to connect to the servers if i have well understood.

Sorry for the dumb postings :P



#15 kvmjohan

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 02:19 AM


 

Open notepad.exe as Admin (Right click -> Run as Administrator). Go to File -> Open. You need to navigate to this folder: "C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc" and it might involve changing folder settings ("Organize" -> "Folder and search options") to show hidden files (View -> Show hidden files). The folder might appear to be empty but change the document type from "Text Document" to "All files" and then open the file called "hosts".

 

Put in these lines at the bottom:

 

85.17.207.151 airvpn.org
212.117.180.25 airvpn.org

 

Then save the file as "hosts" and overwrite the old one. If you didn't run notepad.exe as Admin then you can't save the file.

 

Hopefully this guide will help people. If there are any questions, just ask!

 

This is the part that I think that I am doing something wrong with? Have made these amendments as described but they don't appear to "bite", can someone insert a picture or something that shows how it should be done "correct"? I am sorry if I come off as the total newbie that I indeed am :-)



#16 amnesty

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:24 AM

Hi kvmjohan, welcome. If you were able to add/save those two lines in your hosts file, they should be fine, What are you experiencing that you feel they/something does not "bite"?

 

If you set your physical network (i.e. wire and/or wireless) adapter(s) DNS Servers to the airvpn DNS Servers and you cannot access (resolve) airvpn.org, then your additions to the hosts file did not "bite". Is this what you are experiencing?

 

If you have statically set your DNS Servers can you ping airvpn.org?



#17 kvmjohan

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 04:50 PM

I have actually solved this problem, found the solution on another page in this great forum, it was really the fact that I had not run the Open VPN with admin rights to it.

 

Thanks for all replies etc. on this topic (I am still learning, so thanks for not flaming me).

 

:-)



#18 timde9

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:11 PM

Hi, I usually use Arch Linux but I recently installed windows 8.1 on my laptop as well so I can use photoshop.  But my problem is, after following this guide, nothing is changed and dns leaks are still detected.  In the details section of my network connection it says I am using airvpn dns but when I visit the two websites to check for dns leaks they are still showing comcast dns servers.  Like it is completely ignoring my settings somehow.  Anyone know why?



#19 m1nd7r1p

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 12:24 AM

Thanks! ipleak.net is run by us, do you like it?

 

Kind regards

 

 

Actually, I'm hating ipleak.net.  Would it please be possible for you to provide an actual .torrent file, not a magnet link, for testing the torrent piece of ipleak?  I'm using a NAS box configured to access AirVPN; the client embedded in the box doesn't support magnet links.  In fact, magnet links only work on a computer, and appear to download the actual .torrent file from a peer with the file in question, so I *can't* even extract the info to make a torrent file from the magnet link.  Please stop assuming that all users use your system in a single way.

Thanks.



#20 Staff

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 02:01 AM

 

Thanks! ipleak.net is run by us, do you like it?

 

Kind regards

 

 

Actually, I'm hating ipleak.net.  Would it please be possible for you to provide an actual .torrent file, not a magnet link, for testing the torrent piece of ipleak?  I'm using a NAS box configured to access AirVPN; the client embedded in the box doesn't support magnet links.  In fact, magnet links only work on a computer, and appear to download the actual .torrent file from a peer with the file in question, so I *can't* even extract the info to make a torrent file from the magnet link.  Please stop assuming that all users use your system in a single way.

Thanks.

 

Hi,

 

probably not, we'll see what we can do... in the meantime use another service which provides torrent files instead of magnet links to test.

 

Kind regards







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